Achieving a Scout’s Highest Honor

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Casey White and Kyler Moore have shared many momentous accomplishments in their lifelong involvement in Boy Scouts. They logged in nearly 600 hours of community service a piece, led the Boy Scout Troop 232 that is within the Lake Area’s Kinderhook District, and honored with their progressing Boy Scout ranks in the program’s “court of honor” ceremony six times.

On Sunday at Harper Chapel United Methodist Church in Osage Beach, White and Moore stepped into the spotlight one more time together as they were recognized and officially received the organization’s highest honor – Eagle Scout. The two young men may have different hobbies and interests, but their unified passion for Boy Scouts has strengthened their friendship and created an unbreakable bond between them.

“I am a soccer nut, and Casey is very into band. So we don’t really coincide with many of our outside interests,” Moore said. “However, (Boy Scouts) has brought our friendship closer together, because we enjoy participating in Boy Scouts together.”

Jason Zolecki, Lake Area Boy Scout troop leader, browses through the scrapbooks, awards and recognition mementos displayed at Casey White and Kyler Moore’s Eagle Scout court of honor ceremony Sunday at Harper Chapel United Methodist Church in Osage Beach.

Family, friends, fellow Boy Scout leaders and peers, and members of the community joined in White and Moore’s Eagle Scout rank honor, which both made earned after meeting the proper requirements within the last year. As revealed during the ceremony, Moore and White have earned many important ranks in the Boy Scouts including Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life and now Eagle. Dusty Hoffman, Boy Scout leader and speaker at Sunday’s Eagle Scout court of honor ceremony, said there is a minimum of at least 12 required merit badges and nine others they must receive to earn Eagle. However Moore and White have earned 36 and 39, respectively, and went above and beyond to learn and acquire skills and knowledge from more unique merit badges such as Indian Lore, American heritage, archery, auto maintenance and motorboating.

A member of the Boy Scout Troop 232 Color Guard displays the Missouri state flag during the opening of the Eagle Scout court of honor ceremony.

“An Eagle Scout has served in troop leadership for at least 16 months and spent at least 13 hours serving the community. Both of these Eagles have logged nearly 600 hours of community service; all in all they have completed about 325 different requirements,” Hoffman said. “An Eagle Scout embodies the motto of ‘Be Prepared.’ They have earned skills and learned skills that will benefit them and their fellow citizens for the rest of their lives … The badge, which accompanies an Eagle Scout’s advancement that he wears on his uniform, not only shows that he passed certain tests but there is no past tense in life. On the contrary, the badge cries out, ‘I can right now.’”

Through holding many leadership positions including patrol leader, assistant patrol leader and senior patrol leader, Moore and White have truly experienced a transformation while achieving their Eagle Scout rank. As Boy Scout leader and representative Paul Baur stated during the ceremony of the two young men have progressed “from someone who struggled to memorize the oath and law to someone who lives those words; from someone who wanted to go camping to someone who has been camping many times; from someone who needed to be led to someone who could lead others.”

Paul Barr, Boy Scout leader and representative, explains the stages of Scouting during Sunday’s court of honor ceremony.

Scout Master for Troop 232 John Buckingham agreed with Bauer noting that one of the first things he identifies in a Scout who wants to achieve the rank of Eagle is when they set out to accomplish that goal by 18 years old from a young age.

“Two percent of boys that join Scouting never reach that goal. Even as adults it is not typical for us to set a goal that we want to accomplish in seven years. Yet, these two young men have done exactly that,” he said during the ceremony. “I am very proud to know these two young men and watch them put the finishing touches on their experience in Scouting, watch them as they progress in high school and stand on the doorway to manhood. By becoming an Eagle Scout, you gain more than a medal to wear; you gain some important responsibilities.”

Wess Diehl, Boy Scout leader in the Kinderhook District, introduces Casey White and Kyler Moore as official Eagle Scouts during Sunday’s court of honor ceremony.

During the ceremony, Moore and White were honored with their Eagle Scout badges, certificates of recognition from the Missouri House of Representatives and Missouri Senate, the U.S. General Assembly, flags that flew in Washington D.C. over the U.S. Senate, and special patches and recognition from the U.S. Navy Submarine Veterans Association, as well as pinned their parents with notable medals for their continued support through the process.

Casey White and Kyler Moore finish honoring their parents with special pins during Sunday’s Eagle Scout court of honor ceremony.

Now as Eagle Scouts, Moore and White will walk forward vowing to fulfill all the skills they obtained in the Boy Scouts, as well as display loyalty, courage, service, honor and vision. Moore graduated high school and is studying athletic training this fall at Southwest Baptist University in Bolivar. White is currently a junior finishing out his high school education before moving onto college, as well. Yet, even despite their difference in extracurricular activities over the span of their 13-year friendship, their closeness attained through their shared interest and goals set to become Eagle Scouts as part of the Boy Scouts of America program will keep their bond strong.

Moore said for 13 years of his life, he has learned and taught; camped in a multitude of sites and lit campfires with the fewest of resources. While doing some incredible things, he said he found the main he wished to become.

“This program has given me the tools to become confident when speaking either one-on-one or in a group setting; I know how to present myself in a professional manner, which has served me very well as I seek to enter into the next stage of my life – college,” he added. I am extremely grateful to the Boy Scouts of America program itself and everyone that is involved for helping to guide me down the correct path towards a life of success.”

White said Scouting is a means of preparing for life. The life lessons he learned in Scouts will undoubtedly stay with him in my schooling, my future career, and other challenges he might face in life.

“Friendships I forged in Scouts will stay strong and will remain as we grow apart. I am honored to have earned my rank of Eagle with my friend Kyler, our experiences in the scouting program will stay with us for the rest of our lives,” White added. “I am appreciative of all the opportunities Scouting has afforded me and all the people that helped me along my trail to Eagle.”

Kyler Moore: ‘Trail to Eagle Rank’

• Cub Scout Pack 138 (2001-2006) – Arrow of Light (Feb. 1, 2006)

• Boy Scouts:

  • Scout (Feb. 13, 2006)
  • Tenderfoot (Feb. 5, 2007)
  • Second Class (May 19, 2007)
  • First Class (June 11, 2007)
  • Star (June 8, 2008)
  • Life (March 11, 2009)
  • Eagle (Jan. 18, 2013)

• Merit Badges (36 total) – American heritage, archery, auto maintenance, backpacking, camping, canoeing, carpentry, citizenship in the community, citizenship in the nation, citizenship in the world, climbing, communications, cooking, crime prevention, electricity, environmental science, family life, first aid, golf, hiking, Indian lore, law, leatherwork, lifesaving, motorboating, orienteering, pathfinding, personal fitness, personal management, railroading, salesmanship, signaling, snow sports, swimming, traffic study and wilderness survival.

• Leadership positions – patrol leader, assistant patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, Order of the Arrow representative, senior patrol leader and junior assistant scoutmaster

• Awards and honors – Arrow of Light, 50-mile hike, John Buckingham Scout Spirit Award, Order of the Arrow ordeal, Order of the Arrow Brotherhood, National Youth Leadership training, Sons of Daniel Boone and World Conservation Award

• Eagle Project – build access ramp and deck for garden storage shed for community gardens at Harper Chapel United Methodist church

• Camping nights – 127

• Service hours – 563

Casey White: ‘Trail to Eagle Rank’

• Cub Scout Pack 138 (2002-2007) – Arrow of Light (Feb. 5, 2007)

• Boy Scouts:

  • Scout (Feb. 26, 2007)
  • Tenderfoot (July 9, 2007)
  • Second Class (No. 12, 2007)
  • First Class (Jan. 28, 2008)
  • Star (July 14, 2008)
  • Life (March 23, 2009)
  • Eagle (Dec. 10, 2012)
  • Bronze Eagle Palm (Marcy 11, 2013)
  • Gold Ealge Palm (June 11, 2013)

• Merit Badges (39 total) – American heritage, archery, art, auto maintenance, aviation, backpacking, camping, canoeing, carpentry, citizenship in the community, citizenship in the nation, citizenship in the world, climbing, communications, cooking, crime prevention, drafting, emergency preparedness, environmental science, family life, first aid, golf, hiking, lifesaving, motorboating, music, orienteering, pathfinding, personal fitness, personal management, pioneering, railroading, rifle shooting, salesmanship, shotgun shooting, small boat sailing, snow sports, swimming and wilderness survival.

• Leadership positions – quartermaster, patrol leader, assistant patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, senior patrol leader, den chief, troop guide, junior assistant scoutmaster and summer camp staff (aquatics, three years)

• Awards and honors – Arrow of Light, BSA Kayaking, BSA lifeguard, 50-mile hike, God and Life, John Buckingham Scout Spirit Award, Mile Swim, Order of the Arrow ordeal, Order of the Arrow Brotherhood, National Youth Leadership training, Sons of Daniel Boone, Trainer’s EDGE and World Conservation Award

• Eagle Project – build garden storage shed for community gardens at Harper Chapel United Methodist church

• Camping nights – 181

• Service hours – 554

Achieving a Scout’s Highest Honor
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